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R&B Singer Puff Johnson Succumbs to Cervical Cancer - EOTM! Online – New Media Connoisseurs

R&B Singer Puff Johnson Succumbs to Cervical Cancer

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Singer Puff Johnson, 40, has passed away from cervical cancer. According to Wikipedia she died on June 24th. Johnson was best known for R&B hits “All Over Your Face,” and “Forever More.” She also appeared with Tupac Shakur on his hit single “Me Against the World.” In 1997, Johnson toured Europe as an opening act for Michael Jackson and 3T. Her debut album was also certified silver in the UK. Towards the end of the year Miracle reached Top 40 in the Netherlands and the single “Over & Over” hit the Top 20.

In 2005 Johnson was listed as co-writer on three tracks of A Change Is Gonna Come by singer Leela James (track 3 – “Good Time” along with Gordon Williams, James herself and Kenton Nix, track 7 “When You Love Somebody” with Gordon and James and track 13 “Prayer” alongside Chucky Thompson and James).

Puff Johnson - Photo credit: Getty

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What is cervical cancer?

The cervix is the lower part of the uterus (womb). It is sometimes called the uterine cervix. The fetus grows in the body of the uterus (the upper part). The cervix connects the body of the uterus to the vagina (birth canal). The part of the cervix closest to the body of the uterus is called the endocervix. The part next to the vagina is the exocervix (or ectocervix). The 2 main types of cells covering the cervix are squamous cells (on the exocervix) and glandular cells (on the endocervix). These 2 cell types meet at a place called the transformation zone. Most cervical cancers start in the transformation zone.

Most cervical cancers begin in the cells lining the cervix. These cells do not suddenly change into cancer. Instead, the normal cells of the cervix first gradually develop pre-cancerous changes that turn into cancer. Doctors use several terms to describe these pre-cancerous changes, including cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL), and dysplasia. These changes can be detected by the Pap test and treated to prevent cancer from developing (see “Can cervical cancer be prevented?”).

Cervical cancers and cervical pre-cancers are classified by how they look under a microscope. There are 2 main types of cervical cancers: squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma. About 80% to 90% of cervical cancers are squamous cell carcinomas. These cancers develop in the squamous cells that cover the surface of the exocervix. Under the microscope, this type of cancer is made up of cells that are like squamous cells. Squamous cell carcinomas most often begin where the exocervix joins the endocervix.

Most of the other cervical cancers are adenocarcinomas. Cervical adenocarcinomas seem to have become more common in the past 20 to 30 years. Cervical adenocarcinoma develops from the mucus-producing gland cells of the endocervix. Less commonly, cervical cancers have features of both squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. These are called adenosquamous carcinomas or mixed carcinomas.

Read more.

R.I.P. Puff Johnson.

Wikipedia contributed to this report.

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